Ramadan Idea 28: Video Resources for Children

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One of the benefits of Ramadan in lockdown has been the amazing videos that have been created to help children keep learning… here are a collection!

Ilm did a four part series on Ramadan:

Kisa Kids did full 30 day series!

As did Noor Kids:

Islam From The Start did a 30 day series on a verse of the Quran a day:

For older kids, there was a series on Sura Yaseen:

 

Laylatul Qadr 14: Video Resources for Children

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Alhamdulillah, there are many video resources available now for young children on Laylatul Qadr. Here are a collection below:

  • On the nights of Qadr:

  • Common Amaal for the nights of Qadr:

  • Quran Amaal for the night of Qadr:

  • An English version of Munajat of Imam Ali:

  • Dua No 2 of the Amaal:

  • Dua No 3 of the Amaal:

  • Dua No 4 of the Amaal:

  • Preparing for the Night of Qadr – Part 1

  • Preparing for the Night of Qadr – Part 2

 

Ramadan Idea 27: Understanding the Ramadan Short Duas

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There has been an amazing influx of different ways to help our children know what they are reciting in the short duas, as opposed to reciting it simply by rote. Here is a collection of them!

  • These animated versions of the dua eith simplified words and matching pictures are great to print out, laminate and stick up: Ya Aliyyu Ya Azeem and Allahumma Adkhil
  • We’ve also made it into a game! Here is the link for that.
  • And here is a lovely rhyme for Ya Aliyyu Ya Azeem:

  • Why not get your children to act out the lines in Allahumma Adkhil? Here is a lovely example of one family who did that:

  • And here is another video done by children to explain the dua through art!

  • And here’s another video on Allahumma Adkhil:

  • Here is a video on how to teach Allahumma Adkhil through pictures:

  • Here is an activity on Dua no 3 by Towards Jannah

 

Ramadan Idea 26: Books, Books, Books!

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Muslim Kids Book Nook (check her out on instagram!) put together a comprehensive list of Ramadan and Eid books! Check it out below:

Board Books
1. My Rhyming Eid Book by Fatima Salem
2. It’s Ramadan, Curious George by Hena Khan
3. R is for Ramadan by Greg Paprocki

Picture Books
1. Hassan and Aneesa Love Ramadan by Yasmeen Rahim
2. Hassan and Aneesa Celebrate Eid by Yasmeen Rahim
3. Ramadan Around the World by Ndaa Hassan
4. The Most Powerful Night by Ndaa Hassan
5. Ramadan Moon by Na’ima b. Robert
6. One Perfect Eid Day and No More Cake by Suzanne Muir
7. My First Ramadan by Karen Katz
8. Rashad’s Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr Lisa Bullard
9. Hamza’s First Fast by Asna Chaudhry
10. A Little Tree’s Ramadan Adventure by Eman Salem
11. Who Will Help Me Make Iftar? By Asmaa Hussein
12. Rami the Ramadan Cat by Robyn Thomas
13. Lailah’s Lunchbox by Reem Faruqi
14. Iqbal and His Ingenious Idea by Elizabeth Suneby
15. Celebrating Eid ul-Fitr with Amma Fatima
16. Eid Breakfast at Abuela’s by Mariam Saad
17. The Gift of Ramadan by Shazia Nazlee
18. Migo and Ali: A-Z of Islam by Zanib Mian
19. My Grandma and Me by Mina Javaherbin
20. Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns by Hena Khan
21. Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets by Hena Khan
22. [Personalized] Perfect Eid by Tasmea Mahmud
23. I’m Learning About Eid ul-Fitr by Sanyasnain Khan

Chapter Books
1. Planet Omar: Accidental Trouble Magnet by Zanib Mian
2. House of Ibn Kathir: Year Captain by S.N. Jalali
3. Bedir and the Beaver by Shannon Stewart
4. Isa’s First Fast by Hira Rizvi

Taqwa Escape Room

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I’m super super excited to be sharing this! The wonderful Kisa Kids (kisakids.org) and Camp Noor (camp-noor.org) created a fantabulous Escape Room on Taqwa. I used their detailed notes to put it together for my kids (aged 12 and 14 years) – and they had a blast!

Here is the link with all the different printouts, set up info and guidelines you will need. The escape room has SO many different aspects to it – from cryptographs, to decoders, to invisible ink and spot the differences! I needed to purchase a few small items to set it up, such as an invisible ink pen and a plain puzzle, but otherwise managed to source most things from around the house.

Here are a few pics from our adventures!

 

 

Fasting Times/Terms Game- What's the Time, Angel Jibraeel?

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Aim/Objective: To familiarise children with the times/terms of fasting – (Age Dependent, whether you want to use terms or specific times).

How to Play:

One child is chosen to be Angel Jibraeel, who then stands at one end of the room/garden. The other players stand in a line at the other end. Angel Jibraeel turns his back to commence play by saying “It’s Sehri time, nom nom nom, I’m full!”

The players call out, “What’s the time, Angel Jibraeel?” and Angel Jibraeel turns and answers with a term or time (e.g. Fajr time OR 5.20am). He then turns his back again while the children advance again chanting “What’s the time, Angel Jibraeel?” to which Angel Jibraeel will continue to respond until the players come very close (eg. Zohr time, Asr time, 4 o’clock, etc).

Once the line of players is close to Angel Jibraeel, he can respond to the chant with “It’s IFTAR time!” (or state the specific time of iftaar for the day, e.g. it’s 7.32pm!) at which point, he will chase the players back to the starting line with the aim to catch one of the them, who will then become Angel Jibraeel for the next round of the game.

Ramadhan Idea 25: Ramadan Lessons for Schools (and libraries)

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A few people have asked about any sort of lesson plans for Ramadhan, to be able to do a presentation at school.

Here are a few options…

A. Ramadhan talk at school (put together by a mum):

1. Play the months of the year song and child can show her calendar

2. Ramadhan – why is it one of the most special months of the year? Because…

• The Holy Qur’an was sent down through angels – R can show the Qur’an and read a short chapter, with the meaning

• It is a chance for us to think about ourselves, about all the things we have said and done in the past year, whether we have been kind to people or not and to make promises about how we can try our best to even better next year.

• In fact Muslims love the month of Ramadhan so much that we all look out for the moon of Ramadhan on the first night – R can show her poster on the phases of the moon

3. Play ‘Ramadhan Moon’ (4:05)

4. In the month of Ramadhan, Muslims do lots of things:
• We spend lots of praying, reading the Qur’an and thinking
• We try our best not to say anything or do anything that might make others feel sad..so we try our best to use our bodies in a good way
• Don’t eat anything during the day and when we eat at night, start with milk and dates to give you energy and give thanks for all the wonderful food that you have to eat everyday

5. Use interactive whiteboard to talk about how our bodies are very special and it is nice to use them to do good things and to do things that make people happy. This is what Muslims try especially hard to do in the Month of Ramadhan. Group discussion and annotate diagram on the white board-how can we use our hands, eyes, ears, mouths, tummies, legs, heads in a good way?

6. Read a Ramadan storybook

7. Activity: Make a new moon poster

B. A Ramadan play/assembly for all of primary:

Here is a play/assembly that one school did with all the Muslim children in their school and it was very well received!

C. Ramadan talk at pre-schools and Key Stage 1:

Here is a lesson plan for teaching about Ramadan in Early Years

Here is a powerpoint on Ramadan – with a focus on the moon

D. Ramadan Activity Day in Primary Schools:

Here is an example of an activity day in school, teaching about Ramadan through hands-on activities!

E. One mum sent this in, from her time in at her child’s school:

“I thought I’d share these pictures. I went into my daughter’s school and we did a few Ramadhan activities.This is a British School in Bahrain – a lot of the kids (and teachers) really didn’t know much about Ramadhan so it was really nice spending time with them.

We made a telescope to spot the hilal (after we talked about the moon and watched a nasheed) – the teacher was so excited about the mobiles she told all the rest of the infant classes to make them too! We also made a moon and star mobile which was hung up in the school, and a good deed jar. With the good deed jar for every good thing the child would get a coin. At the end of each week the jar will be emptied and money given to charity. The kids were very enthusiastic!

We also drew around a few children and they labelled how the would fast with different parts of their body. Lots of fun! We finished off with Ramadhan goody bags for all the kids!”

image image1 (2) image5 (2) telescope

F. Here is what another mum shared:

“Since Christmas my son Mahdi has been asking me to come to his school and talk about Ramadan! He had to be a bit patient but i finally went to my sons KG class and did a Ramadan class! The kids and teacher were super happy, but best of all was how excited my son was to share his holiday and be represented in the classroom!

We read Ramadan by Hannah Elliot and Curios George Celebrates Ramadan by Hena Khan. I used my flannel board to show the stages of the moon and how we follow the Lunar Calendar. I also had images of things relating to Ramadan: Quran, no eating, prayer, etc.

After learning about all the Ramadan terms we sang the Ramadan song from Elizabeth Lymers ‘Ramadan Rhymes’ book.

We then did our paper lantern crafts using white crayons to draw moon ? and stars ⭐️ that we would later watercolor paint on cardstock! I had ramadan nasheeds playing on a speaker while we crafted! ?

I ended the session by giving each kid a goody bag with a fruit snack and a paint it your self coin bank in the hopes that it would be used to collect for those less fortunate! (I had given this a lot of thought and went to dollar store to see what i could get for his 26 classmates. But in the end I realized I couldn’t stand the little dollar store trinkets that we all end up throwing away the next day so spent a little bit more on these great paint yourself banks that are $1 a piece at your local DT!)”

F. Here is what another mum shared:

“Last week we visited my daughters class for a Ramadan presentation. We started by introducing Ramadan, why and how we fast. Then I spoke to the kids about how they can fast with their bodies.

Kids were encouraged to come up and label the card board cut out of a girl. Mouth – tell the truth, hands, share etc…

Next all the kids made a good deed spinner – each section had one good deed. The idea was to spin each morning and see what deed they will concentrate on that day.

Finally we played a what’s behind the squares game. Here the kids had to try and figure out what was behind the squares. Kajoor, a mosque, someone visiting the sick etc. Each time the picture was revealed we talked about the significance. The final picture was one of their class which made them laugh!

Then we handed out moon shaped biscuits and Ramadhan party bags.”

P.S. This is what one mum gave out when she went into school!

G: Ramadan sessions at the library

One mum takes it one step further and goes to the local library to share Ramadan there! Working with the librarian, they came up with a lesson plan and voila! It’s now a yearly tradition and all the local library users join in. What a wonderful way of truly sharing Ramadan with the local communities around us!

For some reason, I couldn't share this video with the other pics so here it is as a standalone…A wonderful video showing the engagement of the children at the library event led by Sabera Husain and Al-Hadi Learning Organization that I posted about earlier!

Posted by Buzz Ideazz on Saturday, 7 March 2020

Mother-Daughter Sehri

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In line with making gatherings meaningful in Ramadan, here’s another idea! Last Ramadan, my 11 year old daughter and I held a joint sehri!

There were 6 girls and their mums… as they came in, they were given a sheet of questions to fill out – the mother sheet was different to the daughter’s one – and they weren’t allowed to look at each others! Here is a copy of the sheets.

They also filled out a little slip of paper each – for the girls, the question was: What’s one thing you find hard to discuss with your mother? and for the mums, the question was: What’s one thing you wish your daughter would talk to you about? No names were placed on these to allow safety for both parties to put down any topic they wanted! Here is a copy of the sheet.

We then put these aside and got to the fun stuff 🙂

First up was an obstacle course where each mother-daughter pair was tied together (literally), as if in a three-legged race. Each pair then had to complete an obstacle course which was timed, and the mother-daughter pair that did it in the quickest time, won! The course included bouncing a ball each 5 times, maneuvering the ball in and out of the cushions, lifting the hula hoop over and under the pair together and then running back to the start!

Next was a game where the mums were one team against the daughters. It involved a lot of skittles on a plate, a spoon, and no hands! Mums and daughters faced each other across the plate with only a spoon in their mouths, and the task was to use the spoon to lift as many skittles off the plate and on to a bowl in 1 minute. The group that got the most skittles at the end, were the winners. I am proud to say that the mums beat the daughters for this one 😉

The final game played was a lego communications exercise. Each person received an envelope full of lego pieces – each mother-daughter pair had an identical pack. They then had to put their backs against each other so they couldn’t see each other. The daughters then had 1 min to make a lego creation with what they had, then they had a few minutes to explain their creation (using words/description only – no visuals!) so that their mums could recreate their creation. The mother-daughter pair with the closest resembling creation won! Lots of lessons on communication were extracted from this – such as how simple words can be misunderstood, how communication needs to be as clear as possible, and how shouting to make yourself understood doesn’t help!

We then moved on to the highlight – foooood 🙂 – and while we ate we opened up the small chits they anonymously filled out right at the beginning, and started discussing the issues that came up – things like puberty, friendships, school, etc. Alhamd a fruitful and varied discussion was had!

Finally, last on the agenda was using the sheets they had filled out right at the beginning to see how well mothers and daughters knew each other! The aim was just to have fun and be lighthearted while we learnt about each other, as opposed to test the pair! Each mother-daughter pair took a turn sitting on the sofa and being the centre of attention. I then looked through their sheets and asked them random questions based on it – i would ask the daughters from the mum’s sheet, e.g. what’s your mum’s worst chore to do around the house? and vice versa, e.g what’s your daughter’s favourite movie? We only did about 3 questions each before moving on to the next pair. Each mother-daughter used their time on the hot spot well, cudding close and some very sweet photos were taken during this time!

And so ended a lovely evening where mums and daughters enjoyed quality time with each other, learning more about each other, as well as getting to know the other mums and daughters in the group too!

Ramadan Idea 24: Making Gatherings Meaningful in Ramadan

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We are reminded all the time that Ramadan is a month like no other… and therefore, should not be treated like a normal month. It’s hours, minutes and seconds are precious… and yet, with Ramadan traditionally comes iftar invites, sehri gatherings, sports events and the like. And with that, potentially, the usual chit chat, time-passing and other things that are often not so fruitful.

So how can we marry the two? I have put together a list of ways we can change this gatherings into ibadah, Inshallah, if we do it right! Some are the usual ones, and hopefully some may be some new ideas for you 🙂

  • Clarify your niyyah

It is highly recommend to feed others during this month, and so inviting people over for Iftar is a great way to fulfil this. But whether you are inviting others, or going somewhere yourself, ensuring that your intention is to do it because it is an act that pleases Allah will hopefully bring blessings into your evening. Even if you go to play sports, clarifying your intention that you are doing it to keep your body healthy during this month, so that you can serve Allah in other ways, will allow you to transform that sport into worship.

  • Don’t overdo it

Now that your intention is sorted, it is important to remember that balance is important. Moderation is the way in Islam, and this is the same. There is no need to attend every event that is going on, or accept every invite. It is OK to be choosy and attend a select few which you think will be beneficial for you

  • Have a talk

Last night I attended a wonderful family gathering where we got together to celebrate the birthday of Imam Hasan (as), as well as enjoy some quality time together with cousins. The highlight of the evening was a short talk by a cousin, which was simple, practical and very effective. Adding meaning to a gathering by a short talk is a wonderful way to bless the occasion!

  • Share goals for the month

One lovely thing to do – especially closer to the beginning of the Holy month – is to identify and share at least one goal for yourself for Ramadan. We did this in a friend’s group one year, and found that hearing other’s goals not only inspired us but helped us clarify our own, and motivated us to see it through! To top it all off, the hostess gifted us a little notebook for penning down these goals and other reflections during the month, and had blessed it with a personalised message for each of us!

  • Share a hadith each

If you feel a talk is too formal, or perhaps no one attending can give a talk, then another great way to get everyone learning as well is to ask all coming to bring a hadith to share. When we did this at a gathering of friends recently, we found that the hadith that everyone chose to bring really inspiring and led to some great discussions!

Here is one of the hadith shared – very aptly 😉

  • Share any other info – a favourite verse, a favourite line of a dua, a new Quranic dua you want to learn, one thing they have learnt so far, etc!

In the same vein, why not branch out and give guests a little fun homework! So they can bring a favourite verse that they like, or their favourite line of dua, a new Quranic dua they want to learn to recite in their Qunoots, or even one thing they have learnt so far in the Holy month.

Somebody hosted a themed iftar last year – the theme was ‘His Love is in the Air’ 🙂 All the friends were actually asked to do all four of the suggestions above! Furthermore, they were asked to present it nicely, but were not told why. When everyone had eaten, they began sharing their four things and showing what they had put together. Once each person shared what they had chosen and why it was meaningful to them (which was beautiful in itself!), they picked a name out of a hat and in line with the verse, “You will not attain piety until you spend of what you love; and whatever thing you spend, Allah knows of it.” (3:92), they then were asked to gift their presentation of their favourite verse/dua etc, to that person whom they picked.

Then in line with Allah’s promise of giving us more when we give something, they each got a little something as a gift. The gifts were little things to do with the kitchen and home, such as a cake tin, worktop saver, etc, but each item had a small dua to go with it! So for example, with a tray, the message read: “A tray can hold so many things and requires a balancing act to carry! This Ramadan, may you put all of your prayers and problems on Allah’s tray and leave the balancing to Him!” and so on…

Alhamd it was a lovely evening filled with the remembrance of Allah in the most beautiful, personal way.

P.S. Here is the poster I got! It was so cleverly done, with pictures to symbolise each of the four things, and the text behind.

  • Discuss a good book

Last year we started a book club, and held our first sehri during the month of Ramadan. The book was secular, but had lots of links to Islam and as we all shared our thoughts and relevant hadith on the topic, it felt like a beautiful session with God at it’s center. Why not choose a book a month in advance, and set a date to discuss it during a gathering?

(P.S. This wasn’t the book we read for Ramadan, this came later… but you get the gist ;))

  • Hold an event for a greater cause

There is a group in our community who host a beautiful iftar every Ramadan, and it’s ultimate goal is to raise money for charity. We pay tickets to the event, and there are raffles sold with lots of people donating their services as prizes; lots of money is raised, and an evening of community building and fun is had in the process!

  • Top it all off with Sadaqah!

And lastly, a lovely way to top it all off is to encourage giving when people attend a gathering. For younger children, inviting them to bring in food to donate to a food bank, or new gifts to give to refugees or the sick, is a lovely way to incorporate charity into an event. For adults, having a sadaqah box present on the table alongside the food, and inviting people to donate to a cause is also a lovely idea.

Have you had any meaningful gatherings during Ramadan? Please do share!

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