Marking Important Events at Home - Majlis Ideas

Posted:

In this time of Corona, with our mosques being closed, many of us may have tuned into majlis online. However, the act of doing a majlis in your living room and with all your family members is so beautiful and powerful. It establishes the importance for our children, invites blessings into the home, and shows Allah (swt) that even during these times of hardship when masjids are closed down, we continue to keep the tradition of majlis alive. Many families at times hesitate to do this because they don’t know where to start or what to do. Here is a list of ideas that people have shared which you can do with your children!

  • The atmosphere (optional): bring in the atmosphere of a majlis by dressing in the appropriate clothes (whether black for wafat or bright for wiladat), decorating the house with balloons/lights for wiladats, spreading a white sheet, wearing ithar perfume, bringing out your alams (if you have), and keeping a small tray of fruit for nazr/niyaz. Get your kids involved in this as much as possible, e.g. have them help you in the kitchen as you cut up fruit (apples, oranges, banana etc) and tell them this is our niyaz for after the majlis in which we serve in the name of our Imam and recite surahs on it.
  • After everything is set up, call all family to sit down together.
  • Qur’an: Begin with asking your children to recite the Holy Qur’an even if it’s one of the small surahs. If one of you kids can read, have them read the translation as well.
  • Meditation: One lovely idea shared was to start off with some Muslim meditation, such as through www.muslimmeditation.net/zikr-for-kids.
  • Hadith-e-Kisa – there are different options depending on the age of your children:

Option a) Recite Hadith-e-Kisa by watching this video or sing/recite it yourself using the lyrics under the video.

Option b): There are several books on Hadith-e-Kisa book on amazon, and since it may be short notice to order, you can download the kindle version and read it by printing or on a screen. Here is one of the books.

Option c): Recite Hadith-e-Kisa in Arabic yourself or have one of the kids recite it. Or read the translation.

Option 4: Listen to Hadith-e-Kisa

  • Mystery Box: In a small box or a bag, have items related to the topic of today. Have your kids come and take out items from the bag and have them guess what today’s topic is, or if they already know who it is, have them explain how that item is related to him. If you have a younger crowd, explain to them the significance of each item.
  • Books: Read stories about the holy personality/event that you are marking.
  • Videos: Show videos on the holy personality/event that you are marking
  • Hadith: Have you children research and share hadiths on the holy personality/event that you are marking, if they are old enough. Otherwise choose one or two and explain it to them.
  • Lecture/Speech: Older children can prepare a talk, or a parent can give a small speech. You could also listen to a majlis online.
  • Other methods: Maybe the children can think of how to creatively share the information they have prepared for the occasion, such as through a puppet show, or an interactive quiz.
  • Arts and Crafts: Do an art or craft on the holy personality/event that you are marking. It could also be based on the hadith shared above. Or it could be doing some creative writing/drawing based on the lecture just heard.
  • Munajaat/Nawhas – Have children and family recite a munajaat/nawha on the occasion, whether in English or any other. Or why not ask older children to write a poem/munajaat/nawha of their own and recite that.
  • End with Ziyarah: Recite ziyarah with children. Younger children can say “Salaam alayka ya Rasoolallah and go down the list of the 14 masoomeen.
  • Recite Dua Faraj together
  • Then sit for niyaz and tea/juice. For wiladats, why not bake and decorate a cake for this occasion, then cut it just now while singing Happy Birthday to the holy personality!

* Thank you to Masooma Hydery Kalyan for compiling the original post!

Thoughtful Gift Ideas 48: Angel Lights

Posted:

In relation to this post about holding little majlises for our kids on Thursday nights (https://www.buzzideazz.com/thursday-majlis/) she says:

“We use indoor fairy lights at home which we hang near a window and switch on as it’s getting dark… We tell the kids that we do this so that the angels who are flying around can find our home and when they look through that window they can see us doing our majlis or remembering marhumeen, etc. They then they report it back to Allah and Imam Mehdi and they both get happy when they see that report!”

Alams

Posted:

Alams have featured a lot these last few months in different majalises, workshops and classes!

Some were done in the classes as an art and craft project, others were made at home as giveaways for those who attended the majlis, for the children to keep at home in their room as a reminder of the noble personality that we commemorate.

Thanks to those that sent in these pics!

2017-10-30 14.08.20

 

23117119_875817922566524_6042416004602581054_o

Thoughts on 'fatiha' in majalis...

Posted:

Have been thinking a lot about the majalis we go to, and in particular the fatiha we get. Mashallah everyone loves to contribute and so as well as the fatiha that the host themselves make and provide, many people also bring fatiha on the day which is then distributed into the bags, etc. In particular, a lot of fatiha also comes into mosque for the children’s classes, so our kids go home with bags full of crisps, chocs and drinks every night. This is all great, however – ESPECIALLY in this day and age, it really feels like that food/extras would be much better if it went to those in real need?

Discussing this with family the other day, an idea emerged. Instead of taking fatiha to people’s majlises and mosque classes, what if whenever we went to their houses, we dropped 50p, or a pound or two if we wanted (or whatever the heart desires!) into a ‘fatiha’ money collection box? At the end of the majlis, this could then be counted and donated to one of the many charities out there doing an amazing job. Even a little goes a really long way – for example, Ā£6.50 can buy someone a blanket in Iraq to help them in the long winter months coming up.

This is in no way saying that there shouldn’t be fatiha at all! I think a little something is excellent, both for keeping the kids excited when they come to mosque and it is of course also a sunnah and a pleasure to feed people when they come to our homes for a majlis – I am simply referring to all the extras people bring on top of the norm.

I also think perhaps we need to re-focus on what the fatiha is actually being given for. Fatiha is to encourage people to recite Sura Fatiha for the marhumeen of the giver’s family (as per my understanding), is it not? But when we do give fatiha, how many of us actually give the names of our Marhumeen too? And when we get and eat and enjoy, how many of us actually do remember to recite it? Perhaps with the ‘fatiha’ money collection box, we can also have a piece of paper where people can write down the names of their marhumeen, to be remembered and recited Sura Fatiha for within the majlis itself.

If we start implementing this one household at a time, maybe just sending out a message to all those coming beforehand to let them know…perhaps we can make this a tradition going forward? In terms of classes, we could include it in the letters that parents get so that they are aware too?

Would love to hear your thoughts!!

P.S. November, 2016: Slowly but surely, things are Inshallah changing. In the Children’s Library event a few weeks ago, we asked people to bring in change instead of fatiha, and raised Ā£122 from one afternoon! This will be feeding those really in need, Inshallah – for the thawaab of the Marhumeen of those who donated.

In the classes at mosque this Ashra, we are Inshallah introducing a similar scheme. The poster we will be putting up is attached here, in case anyone wants to do the same in the different jamaats around the world.

Inshallah, here’s hoping that this little change will make a BIG difference!

Ashra Idea 2 - Children's Majlis (Older age group)

Posted:

Idea No 2: Children’s majlis (OLDER AGE GROUP – sent in by a mum)

From the age of about 3 my son really enjoyed listening to matams, going for family majlis’ and having a little azadari area at home where he would put all the Islamic decors and alams we had.

When he was about 5 we decided to have a boys majlis and invited a few friends and also a couple of people from Voices of Passion to reciteĀ Marthia and Matam for them, then ended the majlis by serving their favourite finger food and giving them an Islamic souvenir to take home.

It was amazing to see how the young kids participated in the azadari imam Hussein (a.s), specially at the time of doing Marthias and Matam.

Since then we have been having boys majlis at home every year and alhamdulillah invite more and more kids.

Marking Muharram With Others: Idea 1 - Hold a Children's Majlis

Posted:

And so we begin, Inshallah…

Subhanallah, during the last month and a bit, we have had so many wonderful opportunities to commemorate the event of Kerbala. During the first ten nights, we shared ideazz on how to do this in our homes and with our families. We will now focus on how we can do this as a group, while still involving the children also.

Idea No 1: Hold a children’s majlis (YOUNGER CHILDREN – Idea sent in by Faiza Mawji)

Being a mum of three young children (aged 2, 3 and 4) I have always felt that their age group is missed out on in terms of Muharram education. Although the two youngest attend our community nursery, they are exposed to Muharram based activities and education but only whilst at nursery. Once we take them to mosque then they just follow us like sheep and are kept occupied during majlis. Although I actively explain each nights significance etc, I feel they have never experienced a majlis for their age group and decided to hold one.

We had about 20 children with ages ranging from 2 to 5 years. We tried to stick to the conventional majlis schedule by having Marthiya, Hadith-e-Kisaa, Majlis, Matam and finally Ziyareh. However, with a twist! The majlis needed to be based on the typical majlis but in a way that the children would benefit from.

We had a marthiya recited by a friends young son, Zahid Alidina. He was superb and has recently been reciting in the main program at our mosque.

We had Hadith-e-Kisaa as a story version. So our ‘Mulyani’, a dear friend Shellina Walji who is amazing at getting children’s attention put together a story book with pictures. Her 3 year old son can be seen in the photo’s helping to turn the pages. The story was excellent as it showed the Holy personalities depicted by a ‘shining moon’ under the blanket (as the verse goes “I then witnessed his face glowing like a full moon”). As each member of the Holy Family entered and went under the blanket another moon appeared on the next page. The story had many beneficial educational elements in addition to the story of Hadith-e-Kisaa. It encouraged counting (the children counted as each person entered the blanket), it showed nature scenes (the verses “I created..this Earth…moon..sun…planets..oceans…”) and of course children are very used to the story book format.

We then held a show and tell majlis. We had put up posters of common Muharram themes. An alam, a zarih, a mashk and also some of the art work the children had created at nursery. The ‘Mulyani’ then proceeded to ask and explain to the children what each element meant.

We had borrowed some alams and two zarih’s to keep at the majlis, another friend Ishrat Pirmohammed and the children then recited “Oh my Asger” and did matam. We then did Ziyareh.

The children were given Niyaz in takeout boxes of chips and chicken nuggets, a box of juice and also bags of fruit, dry fruits and a wafer bar. Mums had their own Fatiha bags.

After the whole thing was over I was left with a feeling of immense satisfaction. Our house was blessed with our dear friends and family’s presence, we mourned and remembered Imam Hussein (as) and his family, and best of all; all the children regardless of age did benefit in some way or another.

Obviously being our first childrens’ majlis, there were challenges, but none of them affected the children’s gain from it, but it did give me ideas on what I would change if I were to do it again Insha’Allah.

+ the timing, we had to keep it at 1215, so mothers could pray and come, and also that the mothers could attend ladies majlis at mosque in the morning. I would keep it earlier so that the very small children would not have been close to their nap times or snack/lunch times.

+ perhaps more items in the show and tell majlis.

Overall, I think it was a success, I felt the confidence to do it again and cannot thank our friends and family for all their help and especially to all those who took part so wonderfully and genuinely.

 

Newsletter

Submit your details below for regular Buzz Ideazz updates

Facebook