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This blog is all about the amazing IDEAZZ that are around to make all the different aspects of Islam, from the Prophet’s birthday to marking the day of Friday, fun and appealing to our little ones! Please follow along and most of all, send in your fab ideazz to share with all…

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Marking Important Events at Home - Majlis Ideas

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In this time of Corona, with our mosques being closed, many of us may have tuned into majlis online. However, the act of doing a majlis in your living room and with all your family members is so beautiful and powerful. It establishes the importance for our children, invites blessings into the home, and shows Allah (swt) that even during these times of hardship when masjids are closed down, we continue to keep the tradition of majlis alive. Many families at times hesitate to do this because they don’t know where to start or what to do. Here is a list of ideas that people have shared which you can do with your children!

  • The atmosphere (optional): bring in the atmosphere of a majlis by dressing in the appropriate clothes (whether black for wafat or bright for wiladat), decorating the house with balloons/lights for wiladats, spreading a white sheet, wearing ithar perfume, bringing out your alams (if you have), and keeping a small tray of fruit for nazr/niyaz. Get your kids involved in this as much as possible, e.g. have them help you in the kitchen as you cut up fruit (apples, oranges, banana etc) and tell them this is our niyaz for after the majlis in which we serve in the name of our Imam and recite surahs on it.
  • After everything is set up, call all family to sit down together.
  • Qur’an: Begin with asking your children to recite the Holy Qur’an even if it’s one of the small surahs. If one of you kids can read, have them read the translation as well.
  • Meditation: One lovely idea shared was to start off with some Muslim meditation, such as through www.muslimmeditation.net/zikr-for-kids.
  • Hadith-e-Kisa – there are different options depending on the age of your children:

Option a) Recite Hadith-e-Kisa by watching this video or sing/recite it yourself using the lyrics under the video.

Option b): There are several books on Hadith-e-Kisa book on amazon, and since it may be short notice to order, you can download the kindle version and read it by printing or on a screen. Here is one of the books.

Option c): Recite Hadith-e-Kisa in Arabic yourself or have one of the kids recite it. Or read the translation.

Option 4: Listen to Hadith-e-Kisa

  • Mystery Box: In a small box or a bag, have items related to the topic of today. Have your kids come and take out items from the bag and have them guess what today’s topic is, or if they already know who it is, have them explain how that item is related to him. If you have a younger crowd, explain to them the significance of each item.
  • Books: Read stories about the holy personality/event that you are marking.
  • Videos: Show videos on the holy personality/event that you are marking
  • Hadith: Have you children research and share hadiths on the holy personality/event that you are marking, if they are old enough. Otherwise choose one or two and explain it to them.
  • Lecture/Speech: Older children can prepare a talk, or a parent can give a small speech. You could also listen to a majlis online.
  • Other methods: Maybe the children can think of how to creatively share the information they have prepared for the occasion, such as through a puppet show, or an interactive quiz.
  • Arts and Crafts: Do an art or craft on the holy personality/event that you are marking. It could also be based on the hadith shared above. Or it could be doing some creative writing/drawing based on the lecture just heard.
  • Munajaat/Nawhas – Have children and family recite a munajaat/nawha on the occasion, whether in English or any other. Or why not ask older children to write a poem/munajaat/nawha of their own and recite that.
  • End with Ziyarah: Recite ziyarah with children. Younger children can say “Salaam alayka ya Rasoolallah and go down the list of the 14 masoomeen.
  • Recite Dua Faraj together
  • Then sit for niyaz and tea/juice. For wiladats, why not bake and decorate a cake for this occasion, then cut it just now while singing Happy Birthday to the holy personality!

* Thank you to Masooma Hydery Kalyan for compiling the original post!

7th Imam - Imam Musa Kazim (as): Ideas to mark his wafat/wiladat

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Here are some ideas in which we can mark his important day with children:

  • Create a Mystery Box:

Possible ideas of items:

  1. Black cloth – we wear black to mourn during sad occasions
  2. The # 7 – explain that he’s the 7th Imam
  3. An Angry Face – Explain how Imam Kazim (as) was the opposite of anger, but was known to be the one who swallowed his anger and was patient/calm.
  4. A map with Iraq circled – explain how he’s buried in Iraq.
  5. Picture of the harem of Imam Kazim (as) – explain how we go to Kadhmayn to do his ziyarat where he’s buried.
  6. Handcuffs/box, bicycle chain or any chain or mini cage – explain how he was put in a prison for most of his life even though he was such a good Muslim and our Imam, but the ones who made bad choices caused him to suffer.
  7. A bridge (from legos etc) – Explain how the Imam (as) was left by the bridge.
  8. Toy bread – Explain how he was given very little food while in prison.
  9. Janemaz or Du’a book: Explain how despite all the difficulties he endured, he never gave up his faith in Allah and in fact thanked Him, and continued to worship Him even in the prison.
  1. Kisa Kids Spiritual Season pdf  – This includes crafts you can do with children.
  2. QFatima also has some great resources –

https://qfatima.com/m-14-learning-resources/imam-musa-al-kadhim-pbuh/ – Everything Imam Musa Kazim (as) related

https://qfatima.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/aimmatiy_adult_Web.pdf – page 47 information on Imam Musa Kazim (as)

https://qfatima.com/qtube/imam-musa-al-kadhim-pbuh/ – Audio

https://qfatima.com/wp-content/uploads/woocommerce_uploads/2017/07/timeline07_imam_musa_kadhim.pdf
This is a packet on the Masoomen pages 62-68 are on the 7th Imam related to his life and also includes a worksheet.

  • Videos on the Imam:

  • Ahadith by the Imam to share with your chidlren

 * Thank you to Masooma Hydery Kalyan for compiling the original post!

Fasting Times/Terms Game- What's the Time, Angel Jibraeel?

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Aim/Objective: To familiarise children with the times/terms of fasting – (Age Dependent, whether you want to use terms or specific times).

How to Play:

One child is chosen to be Angel Jibraeel, who then stands at one end of the room/garden. The other players stand in a line at the other end. Angel Jibraeel turns his back to commence play by saying “It’s Sehri time, nom nom nom, I’m full!”

The players call out, “What’s the time, Angel Jibraeel?” and Angel Jibraeel turns and answers with a term or time (e.g. Fajr time OR 5.20am). He then turns his back again while the children advance again chanting “What’s the time, Angel Jibraeel?” to which Angel Jibraeel will continue to respond until the players come very close (eg. Zohr time, Asr time, 4 o’clock, etc).

Once the line of players is close to Angel Jibraeel, he can respond to the chant with “It’s IFTAR time!” (or state the specific time of iftaar for the day, e.g. it’s 7.32pm!) at which point, he will chase the players back to the starting line with the aim to catch one of the them, who will then become Angel Jibraeel for the next round of the game.

COVID-19 - How to HELP OTHERS with your children at home

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In dark times, our instinct is always to ‘look for the helpers’ (Fred Rogers). An even stronger instinct, is to actually BE a helper. Personally, this is frustrating me right now as we have been told to do the opposite in many ways. We have been told to take our children and stay at home and do nothing, for our safety and that of others.  And yet my heart yearns to the doctors, nurses, cleaners, supermarket stockers and sellers who are on the front line, so to speak. I have no such qualifications, and even if I did, what would I do with my kids?

So that got me thinking… what exactly CAN I do with my kids? I asked them too and together, we came up with quite a few ideas, so I thought I would share these, in case it is helpful to anyone else:

  • DO stay at home:

Time and time again, we have been told to do this. While we may remain asymptomatic or suffer only mildly, we can still carry it to others who are more vulnerable and this may only have an effect weeks after. So cancel your play dates, don’t be tempted to ‘make the most’ of this time off, and Stay. At. Home.

  • Pray:

We all know the power of dua, and dua done by innocent hearts will Inshallah be heard and answered quickly! Age dependent, you can ask your children to recite 5 salawats, pray and extra 2 rakat salaat for hajaat, recite a tasbeeh of Ammayujeebul, or the short dua no 7 in Saheefe Sajjadiya (When Misfortune Descended and at the Time of Distress). Find something that works for you and your family and do it daily, Inshallah.

  • Give charity:

Many of us are supremely fortunate in where we live, the resources we have to stay occupied, and the healthcare system around us. There are millions of others – refugees, those in countries of povery, poor healthcare systems, war-torn countries – who do not have this soft landing to rely on. Many charities are now collecting to help support such people – discuss this with your children (age dependent), and encourage them to give from their own money that they may have. It does not have to be much, but every little helps.

Here are two reputable charities raising for this cause:

www.justgiving.com/coronavirus

http://www.noororphansfund.org/covid-19/

  • Paint something heartwarming and place it on your window/outside:

Many reports from Italy have emerged of people painting these rainbows with the words “Everything will be all right” and then hanging these off balconies and windows. Such a wonderful way to lift the spirits of those who still have to be outside and out and about!

And how about painting inspirational messages on rocks and leaving them outside for people to find?

(Rocks painted by Sarah Rosser – FB)

Or draw fun, inspirational messages on the pavement?

  • Reach out to your neighbours:

Many of us aren’t able to travel far to help people, but what about those in our locality? We may know our neighbours and have a WhatsApp group with them (and if we don’t, then what better time to make one?!), and so we can ask if any on there need any food/groceries, etc.

Becky Wass created this form to hand out to neighbours around her, offering help where needed. These cards can be a good way of getting some exercise in with the kids, and you can select what you can offer in terms of help to make it manageable. Here is the printable pdf: bit.ly/viralkindness

  • Uplift and interact with people around you – from a distance:

Although we may have to stay within our own spaces, there are many ways to interact with others around us. There have been numerous uplifting examples of neighbours in Italy and Spain (who are in lockdown) singing and playing music together from their balconies, doing exercise together and even playing tennis from windows! Necessity is the mother of invention – plant the idea in your children and see what emerges?!

  • Send care packages to hospitals:

A nurse friend suggested this, saying how overwhelmed, overworked and underappreciated they often felt, and how they would love to receive some support. So get baking with your kids (healthy yummy treats would be very appreciated I’m sure!), and drop them off to a hospital with some home-made cards (maybe with some poems that the children have written?) and let’s try and send them love and support in this way!

  • Donate to food banks:

With most religious organisations turning to live streaming, many of the popular sources of food donations to food banks have therefore been shut. One of our neighbours offered to collect food bank items from our street and go once a week to donate them to a food bank, and I thought it was such a lovely idea! So why not have a basket of donations that kids gather over the week, which you can then drop off?

  • Send cards to elderly:

As we all know, the group most vulnerable are the elderly. This means that visits to them – whether in their homes or in nursing homes – have been cut dramatically, probably adding more loneliness to their lives. One of the things we could do to help them know they are not alone and they are being thought of, is to send them cards.

Children can make and decorate these cards, write messages inside,, and then these can either be posted or popped into their letter boxes. Imagine their surprise at receiving these hand-made messages!

  • Facetime family and friends:

With the elderly that you know amongst family and friends, a great way to cheer spirits is to call regularly. I loved this idea of playing games with them online too – although there are plenty of online games to play together (like Psych), who’s to say you can’t play the traditional games like Scrabble?!

(Jennifer Williams Barnes – FB)

  • Adopt-a-Grandparent:

On a similar vein, check out this program to link the elderly with children to create lifelong friendships? Love the initiative – they are looking for both child volunteers (over 7) as well as elderly people who would love some company. Sign up on www.umojaoutreach.org/care

Rajab Idea 8: Rajab Resources

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There are a growing number of resources out there to help mark this special month, here they are below:

  • Kisa Kids have been releasing booklets for the last few years which are FULL of activities to mark the occasions of the months. They are available to download for free here. They also have banners, amal checklists, etc.
  • Zair Zabr Play has a few free printables for Rajab, including a booklet on Me’raj.
  • Here is one by Lunar Learners on Me’raj (Although there is much debate about Me’raj being on the 27th of Rajab, with the consensus being it’s not – that date is important for Mab’ath), you can use these on the other dates that have given for Me’raj)

The Prophetic Path to Parenting Part 1- Age 0 to 7 (The Master)

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Lots of research has gone into this well-written article!

Here’s a snippet:

“As per the title, the child is “The Master” for the first 7 years and this means that formal or strict standards should not be rigorously implemented, particularly in terms of Islamic rituals. How many of us have had the Quran Hifz inculcated into us from the age of 4/5 and onwards or fasting the long hours or knowing the 4 rakaat prayers by say, age 7? When in Surah Baqara (2:256) Almighty Allah Azawajal, tells us that “There is no compulsion in religion”, why do we compel our children to follow rituals so stringently? I am by no means saying that they should not learn the Quran, attempt fasting or know how to pray Salaat. However, it should be proportionate to their age and development. We should explain and inform children, that when they think of Allah – that Allah’s name becomes synonymous with LOVE and MERCY and not FEAR and SHAME. When I was growing up,I learnt a lot when I was young due to fear and peer pressure – not the best way to teach! It was drilled into me by well meaning parents and Islamic classes. Is it time to ease up a little?”

https://ilmfullyyours.home.blog/2019/11/14/the-prophetic-path-to-parenting-part-1-age-0-to-7-the-master/

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